ACID REFLUX DISEASE

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Saturday, August 14, 2010

What causes Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?

What causes Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease?

The cause of Gastroesophageal / Acid Reflux Disease is complex. There probably are multiple causes, and different causes may be operative in different individuals, or even in the same individual at different times. A small number of patients with GERD produce abnormally large amounts of acid, but this is uncommon and not a contributing factor in the vast majority of patients. The factors that contribute to Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease are the lower esophageal sphincter, hiatal hernias, esophageal contractions, and emptying of the stomach.

Lower esophageal sphincter

The action of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is perhaps the most important factor (mechanism) for preventing reflux. The esophagus is a muscular tube that extends from the lower throat to the stomach. The LES is a specialized ring of muscle that surrounds the lower-most end of the esophagus where it joins the stomach. The muscle that makes up the LES is active most of the time. This means that it is contracting and closing off the passage from the esophagus into the stomach. This closing of the passage prevents reflux. When food or saliva is swallowed, the LES relaxes for a few seconds to allow the food or saliva to pass from the esophagus into the stomach, and then it closes again.

Several different abnormalities of the LES have been found in patients with Gastroesophageal / Acid Reflux Disease. Two of them involve the function of the LES. The first is abnormally weak contraction of the LES, which reduces its ability to prevent reflux. The second is abnormal relaxations of the LES, called transient LES relaxations. They are abnormal in that they do not accompany swallows and they last for a long time, up to several minutes. These prolonged relaxations allow reflux to occur more easily. The transient LES relaxations occur in patients with GERD most commonly after meals when the stomach is distended with food. Transient LES relaxations also occur in individuals without GERD, but they are infrequent.

The most recently-described abnormality in patients with Gastroesophageal / Acid Reflux Disease is laxity of the LES. Specifically, similar distending pressures open the LES more in patients with GERD than in individuals without GERD. At least theoretically, this would allow easier opening of the LES and/or greater backward flow of acid into the esophagus when the LES is open.

Hiatal hernia

Hiatal hernias contribute to reflux, although the way in which they contribute is not clear. A majority of patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease have hiatal hernias, but many do not. Therefore, it is not necessary to have a hiatal hernia in order to have GERD. Moreover, many people have hiatal hernias but do not have Gastroesophageal / Acid Reflux Disease. It is not known for certain how or why hiatal hernias develop.

Normally, the LES is located at the same level where the esophagus passes from the chest through the diaphragm and into the abdomen. (The diaphragm is a muscular, horizontal partition that separates the chest from the abdomen.) When there is a hiatal hernia, a small part of the upper stomach that attaches to the esophagus pushes up through the diaphragm. As a result, a small part of the stomach and the LES come to lie in the chest, and the LES is no longer at the level of the diaphragm.
what-are-symptoms-of-uncomplicated Acid Reflux Disease

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